Tag Archives: Wepwawet-Yinepu

G is for Great Expectations

11 Apr

I’ve lived a life full of great expectations; sometimes foolishly optimistic, but always expecting more of myself and my loved ones than we could handle. Sometimes, it lead to beautiful things, memories I treasure dearly. Other times, my expectations were fallow, and I weep at the loss of those infinite possibilities.

It’s far too easy to hold yourself back when you’ve lost a possibility. Perhaps you don’t land the job you want, or your finances just don’t pan out for a trip. Maybe you’re just shy of a certain GPA, or one you love sees someone else as a better mate than you. When that next opportunity comes up to make the job, the grade, the love – you tremble. You don’t want to do it, you don’t want to fail again. And that’s okay. That’s natural – but you have to take the leap.

Netjer wants more from us, no matter what form It takes. It is greater than us, It sees farther than us, It knows our capabilities. My Fathers are great forces in this world, building life and opening the way for all that is good, and I know in my heart what They expect of me, and it’s realizing that their expectations are far greater than my own, and give me the courage I need to act on and improve my self-expectations.

Their expectations?

To Love, and to Live.

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F is for Filial Piety

7 Apr

In the Classic of Xiao, Confucius wrote: “The ancient kings had a perfect virtue and all-embracing rule of conduct, through which they were in accord with all under heaven. By the practice of it the people were brought to live in peace and harmony, and there was no ill-will between superiors and inferiors.”

This ideal – which sings to me of ma’at – is that of filial piety, the honoring of ones’ parents and ancestors. Of late, I’ve read many blogs by those who are lovers, spouses, or companions to their gods. My relationship with my primary gods and goddesses is different – I see them as my parents and guides. It’s a very different relationship than the relationships I’ve had with other Unseen beings (god and spirit alike) – but so is my relationship with my human mother. I might tease her, and we might fight, sometimes I even feel that I hate her; but at the end of the day, I’m here to help her, and I’m in awe of what she has done and has continued to do for us and our family. Likewise, I may joke around at the end of the day with my Fathers, but ultimately, I’m here serving Them, offering Them incense and water when I have naught else, because I love Them, and am awed by what they have done for me and Our family.

 

Ptah-Sokar is my Father; Wepwawet-Yinepu is my Father – as long as I live a life that honors Them, as long as I serve Them, I achieve that great virtue on which Confucian society is built. I may not know much about Confucian ideals, but I am grateful to him for sharing this one.

Hail, Fathers! May I honor you in all I do.

F is for Four Libations before Ritual

20 Mar

I offer cool water to my Akhu.

Our ancestors – known and unknown, family in blood and in spirit. They came first. They came before us, they paid with their lives to make us who we are. And so we honor them first.

I offer cool water to Wepwawet.

The Opener of Ways, the lord of the crossroads, the first scout. He stands on the king’s banners, leading the army on. We invoke Him second, and ask for His aid to facilitate communication with those in the Unseen World.

I offer cool water to my Sebau.

Our teachers – and not just the ones from school. Those living people who have taught us major life lessons, who helped shape us into better people are our Sebau (meaning “those who give instruction”). They are, perhaps, leaders in our spiritual lives as well – priests, god spouses, and lay people who help us understand the mysteries of our gods. We must remember what we’ve learned from them as we live our lives – and that includes our ritual work.

I offer cool water to Ma’at.

The goddess embodying the nature of the universe – of balance, of justice, of truth. Ma’at comes last, because She is first. We seek to live up to Her ideals, we seek to bring ma’at into the world with our actions. She is grounding, a centering moment as we leave the prescribed words of our rites behind to our person practice and prayer.

 

I’ve previously discussed that I want to begin an esbat practice, a phrase which here means a weekly practice honoring the phases of the moon. This is separate from my senut rite, and not unrelated from our Kemetic Orthodox duas at Pesdjentiu (the New Moon) and Tepy-Semdet (the Full Moon). And so the structure of ritual that we have as Kemetic Orthodox now begins to inform my fledgling constructions for lunar ritual.

Calling Quarters is traditionally a matter of the Four Directions or the Four Elements that comes before an esbat. I don’t have a strong connection to the elements, nor do I particularly associate them with the moon. I have no connection at all to the points of the compass (except in the context of sunrise and sunset), if anything, my directions are six: behind, ahead, above, beneath, side-to-side. For a long time, I have thought that things must be done in a certain way – and in some contexts, they should. Senut is senut because of the way the words are patterned, the Our Father is the Our Father for the same reason. Esbats are not a Kemetic Orthodox practice. What I do to mark the journey of the moon is irrelevant to my fellow Remetj and Shemsu. It is not relevant to the Unitarian-Universalist church I attend, and I am not a member of a coven that has a specific ritual for the lunar cycle.

This is Personal Religion: something that exists regardless of if you’re Catholic, Buddhist, Wiccan, or anything in between. It’s a chance to try new things, to create tradition, and honor the world as Oneself.

 

Examine your own faith-life, if you have one. Feel free to share what you do that separates you from others in your spiritual practice below.

I know this is totally unimportant…

11 Mar

But it makes me smile that people can say “Dad” to me, and we share Him.

Sat Ptah-Sokar her Wepwawet-Yinepu! Meryt Bast her Sekhmet-Hethert!

9 Mar

Daughter of Ptah-Sokar, He in the Moment of Creation!
Daughter of Wepwawet-Yinepu, the First to go Forth and lead the Way!
Beloved of Bast, the Mother of Joy!
Beloved of Sekhmet-Hethert, the Mother of Strength!

Dua Netjer!